ADVOCACY 101: Tips to Get You Started in Powering Your Voice | NAWBO

Any woman business owner can be an advocate for yourself and others—to speak out to create positive changes that support business success and growth. Here are a few simple strategies and considerations to get you started. Start small at your city or state level and work up from there!

Know Your Elected Officials

  • Who are your state and local representatives?
  • How do they vote on issues related to small business?
  • What leadership positions do they hold?
  • What questions do you have for these legislators?

Share Your Personal Narrative

  • What inspired you to launch your business?
  • What product/service do you provide for your community?
  • What impact has your business had on your community?
  • How do you serve your community?
  • What are your future goals?
  • How can they support your success?

Follow Up After a Call or Meeting

  • Prepare a thank you letter for the legislator and their staff
  • Share information or documents discussed during the call or meeting
  • Share your business website
  • Schedule a future call or meeting, if necessary

Other Useful Tips

  • Be polite, respectful and graceful: Doing so will help to make you a strong representative for your business and community
  • Research ahead of time: Taking the time to learn about your representative beforehand will help ensure a meaningful conversation for all parties
  • Find common ground: Setting the tone of the meeting by discussing common interests will help you and the legislator/their staff relax and be more conversational

Other Useful Tools

  • Consider how social media can play a role in your advocacy: What platforms are you using and how? Have you used videos to communicate with state and local officials? How can you engage in conversation with legislators via social media?
  • Use your voice in print like op-eds and blogs: Is your topic relevant? What is your goal? Where do you want your piece placed? Who is your target audience? What actions should readers be thinking about when they finish reading your piece?